1. Power BI - Create new table by expanding columns

    I use Power BI to visualise the team I work with and to see where we have been spending our time. Recently, I was trying to see if I could visualise what people would be busy with over the next few months and found it a bit challenging since the source data becomes multi-dimensional. I used a small Ruby script to bail me out of the immediate need that I had but I wanted to look for a method that worked within Power BI itself (using PowerQuery and/ or DAX) so that the solution was self-contained.…


  2. My Hardware Setup at Home

    With the recent discussions around working from home and home-based learning due to COVID-19, someone asked me what equipment I use at home, and I wrote up something to make a list of what serves me well. It’s equipment that I have collected over the better part of 10 years buying some things new and some things used to end up with a setup that works well for me. For most part, I have the same setup in the office which makes muscle memory work more effectively.…


  3. Launching a Windows 10 App from the Command Line

    I’m trying to note down things that have helped me while using Windows – to the point that I feel that my setup is geared towards me, and it sometimes, becomes a challenge when using someone else’s computer temporarily. The post is for me to remember how I did something but if it helps someone, that’s a plus!…


  4. Ruby Tricks 2 - Net::HTTP and HTTPS/ SSL

    I have been using RSpec to test an API and calling web services is a natural part of the work – so, I find myself going back to the Net::HTTP documentation from time to time. Most of the items are quite standard and the very well-written page (almost a cheatsheet) is at: https://docs.ruby-lang.org/en/2.7.0/Net/HTTP.html


  5. Ruby Tricks 1 - Environment Variables in Config Files

    In a recent conversation, we were discussing the practice that we should not store values such as API Keys in the configuration file, but instead load them from an environment variable. The reference was to how the database.yml in Rails allows us to provide the details as environment variables in production. I needed to store some such values for some API tests that I was building using RSpec, and decided to find out how Rails does it – and realised that it’s blindingly obvious.…


  6. JRuby on Windows: Day 1 - Running Scripts

    JRuby is a Java implementation of Ruby that runs atop the Java Virtual Machine. In a previous post, we covered how to install JRuby on Windows. We also saw the commands for running and installing gems, bundler, irb and so on. Take a look at it again for the basics, if you need a refresher.…


  7. Jekyll on Ruby 2.7 on Windows: Installation

    This started due to something on Twitter where someone questioned if Ruby + Windows + Jekyll was still viable in 2020. Since I had just set up Ruby 2.7, I decided to give it a spin after suggesting that I didn’t think that there will be a problem!…


  8. JRuby on Windows: Day 0 - install and Hello World

    JRuby is a Java implementation of Ruby that runs atop the Java Virtual Machine. The JRuby wiki has this to say:…


  9. Deleaker - finding leaks in C++ Builder and Delphi projects

    Deleaker is an extension that can help C++ Builder and Delphi users to find leaks in their applications. This post provides a very brief introduction to it.…


  10. Using RadiantCMS in 2020

    After a very long time and being recently frustrated by using Wordpress for one of our sites, I was keen to go back and check how things were with RadiantCMS which had long been my go-to CMS for my work. I really liked how it worked. However, the rapid jumps in Rails versions at one time meant that Radiant found itself a bit left in the cold, and lost favour. [1-5]: 3…


  11. Use Command Files to Switch Directories Easier on Windows

    We all have our own preference of which operating system works best for us, and helps us enhance our productivity. Over time, we also devise our own ways to make the operating system work better for us, and to train ourselves to work better on our computers.…


  12. Journey to Bluemix: Part 4 - Updating the Buildpack

    In a previous post, we covered how to get your Jekyll blog working with Bluemix – that post was written in 2017 and if you followed the instructions now, you would find that you are unable to deploy your site since it fails. You will see an error as below on your command line.…


  13. Creating iCalendar (ICS) Files with Full-day Events in Ruby

    I recently got a file with numerous dates to be “marked in my calendar” – the original file was a PDF file but what I really wanted was to have this data put into my calendar so that I have access to it when I look at my calendar. Last year, I had done this manually by creating a CSV in Excel and then importing it into the Outlook desktop client, as explained in this article at Tech Republic. We use Office 365, so this synchronizes to the online calendar and then on to all my devices. The online calendar in Office 365 only allows importing ICS (iCalendar) files and since that is what I use most of the time, I decided to see how I could create this file when I got the list of dates for this year. It’s also convenient to mail this file to others who can use it to import it into their calendars – making the whole process worth the effort.…


  14. Getting work done in a Flight

    Working on planes in economy is always a hit and miss. But, I had a great experience on a lightly loaded flight from Singapore to Kolkata…


  15. Travel, Calendars and Time Zones - 6 Tips

    Time zones really are the bane of travellers… and if you don’t get it right, you might not wake up or reach an appointment in time and so on. Modern technology and gadgets help – so, this is one place where I use a mix of tools to help stay on top of things. The list below is a compilation of things that work for me.…