1. Journey to Jekyll: Part 3 - Sharing with AddThis

    In a previous post, we covered how to get your Jekyll blog working with Bluemix and also how to get Google Analytics working on your new site. The next thing is to set up some way to allow people to share the content you have.…


  2. Sending E-mail with Ruby

    I know that there are a number of guides online that provide the basic source for sending email using Ruby but I found that the basic sample code was lacking in one major respect – it did not set the date on the outgoing email. That meant that there was no specific “sent time” for the email and its treatment would depend on the email client. For example, Thunderbird would mark it with the date/ time at which it was downloaded.…


  3. Journey to Jekyll: Part 2 - Google Analytics

    In a previous post, we covered how to get your Jekyll blog working with Bluemix. Once you start posting your content, you’ll want to do more with it and will want to see how many pages are accessed and who’s coming knocking from where. For this, one of the easiest ways to get started is to use Google Analytics.…


  4. Journey to Bluemix: Part 2 - Custom Domain for your Application

    Once you have gone through the trouble of setting up your static website on Bluemix, you’ll obviously want to set up a custom domain for your application. While the URL with the xyz.au-syd.mybluemix.net sounds exciting, you obviously will want to point your custom domain to it – this post quickly touches on that.…


  5. Jekyll on Bluemix for New Users

    Static sites should be really easy to set up – once you have the HTML, just put the files in a publicly accessible web directory and that should be it. But, one of the things that I wanted to do was to host this on IBM Bluemix and that meant trying to understand a few more things.…


  6. Shoutout to some really useful online JSON tools

    Just a shout-out to a couple of great online JSON tools that I use quite a lot when working with new JSON files.…


  7. Changing Windows Console Colours

    I’ve always found it useful to have the Windows prompt (console, terminal or DOS Prompt) window showing in different colours. Rather than the boring white text on black background, I find it useful to have different windows running different colour combinations – this helps a lot when doing different things in different windows. Visually knowing that a script is running in the red window or the green window, etc. quickly helps to find the right window and saves a couple of seconds each time on.…


  8. Getting Started

    We all start a new year with the hope and expectation of doing something a bit more differently from the previous year, and the one thing that has been on my mind has been the idea of getting back to noting and writing things online.…