1. 7 + 1 Tips for E-mail Subject Lines

    E-mail gets a bad rap and depending on who you ask, it’s terrible or wonderful. To me, it complements numerous other tools and I realised that I actually over-think the subject lines for my e-mails. So, I’m sharing that here!…


  2. JRuby: Using locally built JRuby JARs with Warbler

    If you decide to rebuild JRuby locally and want to use Warbler to create an executable JAR with the newly built JRuby, it’s not obvious what you should do. This post provides one way to manage this.…


  3. JRuby on Windows: Day 3 - Building from Source

    There are times when you will need to try out if your code works with a new version of JRuby or maybe, even make a change to the JRuby code and see if this is a change you want to contribute. This post touches on how to set up and build JRuby on your Windows PC.…


  4. Ruby Tricks 9 - Solving SassC Installation Errors

    On Windows, you might face an error installing SassC for use with Rails or with Jekyll, especially if you are using JRuby. Resolving this issue requires having a C/C++ compiler installed on your Windows system and on your path.…


  5. Cairo with Ruby - Converting code from Cairo to RCairo

    Cairo Graphics is a powerful 2D graphics library. Although Cairo is a C library, there are bindings available for many languages. The RCairo gem allows Ruby programs to use Cairo.…


  6. Cairo with Ruby - Samples using RCairo

    Cairo Graphics is a powerful 2D graphics library. Although Cairo is a C library, there are bindings available for many languages. The RCairo gem allows Ruby programs to use Cairo. This page has the simple samples from the Cairographics website, ported to run under Ruby using the RCairo gem.…


  7. Cairo with Ruby - Installation on Windows

    Getting Cairo Graphics to work with Ruby on Windows is straightforward although it scares you a bit in the installation.…


  8. Java on Windows: switching to a specific Java version/ runtime

    This post show how to have multiple Java runtime environments on your PC and switch between them on Windows so that a particular program uses the version that you want it to.…


  9. Journey to Jekyll: Part 9 - Upgrading to Ruby 2.6

    I have used Jekyll since Christmas 2016 and have never updated it since it worked fine for me. Just over a year ago, I tried to update to Ruby 2.7 when it was brand new and ran into a few errors and backed off for a while. In fact, I have been running Ruby 2.2 on my computer only for my Jekyll site. Finally, I decided to move up to Ruby 2.6 at least.…


  10. Journey to Jekyll: Part 8 - Speeding up the Site Part 2

    In Part 1 of Speeding up the Site, we optimised some images and removed AddThis. In this post, we try to optimise all the images before we push the site.…


  11. Journey to Jekyll: Part 8 - Speeding up the Site Part 1

    I started on the site around Christmas 2016 and have been adding things to it over time, assuming that a static site with very little Javascript and nothing special on it other than content and the necessary images would be quite fast (and it feels that way where I am). For some other work, I was looking at general principles for speeding up sites and decided to run a page speed test on my site also just to get a feel of some numbers.…


  12. Go home on Windows

    People from the Linux/ UNIX/ MacOS world wonder about the HOME on Windows and this came up in a Twitter thread recently.…


  13. Ruby Tricks 8 - Solving Bundler Certificate Errors

    In the Ruby world, Bundler is fantastic when it comes to dependency management. But sometimes, when you use it, especially for an older Ruby version, you might run into certificate errors. Here’s one way to fix that.…


  14. Android Studio on Windows: Day 0 - Install and Hello World

    In this post, we look at the steps required to run Android Studio on Windows 10. My main reason to do so is to build some simple apps and to also try to use JRuby on Android with the Ruboto project.…


  15. JRuby on Windows: Day 2 - Creating Executable JARS

    A common question in the Ruby world (especially from newbies) is to wonder how to produce a stand-alone executable that can be distributed. Ruby is inherently an interpreted language and currently there are a few ways to create an executable but none that are supported out of the box. One method to achieve this is to use JRuby and a tool called warbler to package your code into a Java Archive (JAR) file that can be run on any system where you have Java (i.e., a Java Virtual Machine set up). Let’s see how to do this for a Ruby project.…


  16. Journey to Jekyll: Part 7 - Redirect HTTP to HTTPS on IBM Cloud/ Bluemix Staticfile Buildpack

    This site is set up on IBM Cloud and built using Jekyll. The previous posts in the Journey to Jekyll with IBM Cloud/ Bluemix have covered bits about getting started. In the previous post in this series, we saw how to secure the site using an SSL certificate from ZeroSSL.…


  17. Ruby on Windows: pik to run code with a specific Ruby version

    Ruby has an important release every year on Christmas Day. As a result, it’s very likely that over a period of time, you will have a few important versions of Ruby installed on your computer. Every time you install a new version with big changes, you invariably end up with the need to run an old program with an older version because of a dependency or deprecation (or just caution, in some cases).…


  18. Recipe/ Notes about making a delicious grilled cheese on toast

    I don’t cook a lot but sometimes, I find a recipe that looks easy to follow, is fast and is delicious. I found this video on YouTube about making a better grilled cheese toastie (or as the comments insist, a ‘grilled cheese on toast’). Whatever you want to call it, I tried making it and it tasted great and my son loved it. I have watched the video a couple of times and strongly recommend you to watch it also. Once you’ve done that, this post will make more sense and has a nice little picture to remind you of the details.…


  19. Ruby Tricks 7 - Updating bundler default version

    It’s generally a good idea to keep your gem installation clean and you can do that by doing gem cleanup or gem cleanup [GEM_NAME] which will remove the older versions of the gem. Of course, some times, you have applications (or other gems) that rely on a specific version – so, you need to keep those (or re-install them using bundle install).…


  20. Portable setup for PostgreSQL on Windows

    The normal method for using PostgreSQL on your Windows machine is to download the installer and then set it up. It’s easy and will do all the necessary things that you need for it. It will also set up services and other things that you might need. On the other hand, if you’re someone who uses PostgreSQL only some times and do not want it running all the time, or if you want to use different versions and want to have them switched on from time to time, or if you just want a portable setup that you can copy to any computer and get it running, then this post is for you.…




All Posts by Tags