1. Redirect all output to /dev/null on Windows Command

    A lot of Linux code redirects output to /dev/null as a way of not sending any output to the console. I work in Windows and often use Command Prompt (cmd.exe) as the command shell. This is just a small note to remember how to do the same in Windows.…


  2. Solve: VisualVM does not start up on Windows with OpenJDK

    I just downloaded and tried to run VisualVM on Windows 10 with OpenJDK 8 but it failed. The fix is simple but took a few minutes to find the solution.…


  3. JRuby on Windows: Using the G1 Garbage Collector Helps

    When running with JRuby, you have a few options for selecting the Garbage Collector. This post shows one observation on the memory consumption depending on the garbage collector and JAVA version.…


  4. JRuby on Windows: Day 3 - Using Apache POI (Java) to create XLSX files

    One of the great advantages of using JRuby is the ability to connect with Java libraries (JARs) and call Java code from your Ruby scripts. This post shows how to use Apache POI (the Java API for Microsoft Documents) to generate a simple XLSX file.…


  5. A more verbose prompt in Windows CMD Shell

    I work in Windows and often use Command Prompt (cmd.exe) as the command shell. This post touches on the new command prompt I use.…


  6. Rails 7.0 with Ruby 3.0 on Windows: It just works!

    Rails 7.0.0 was released just yesterday and as a Ruby user primarily on Windows, I was keen to see if it works and runs on Windows.…


  7. Ruby 2.7 on Windows: Install and Hello World

    Ruby is a dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. It has an elegant syntax that is natural to read and easy to write (from the Ruby web site). On Christmas Day 2020, the core team released version 3.0 with major improvements and new features. However, Ruby 3.0 was a major release with lots of changes and some people are still more familiar with Ruby 2.x first. Last week, it was announced that Ruby on Rails 7.0 would require Ruby 2.7 as the minimum supported version. So, I’m updating my system from Ruby 2.6.8 to Ruby 2.7.4 as my main working version. If you’re new to Ruby 2.7 on Windows, this post will help you get started with Ruby 3 on Windows, and covers the basics of installation. This post is along the same lines as the JRuby Day 0 post from earlier and also the Ruby 3.0 Day 0 post


  8. Oracle from Ruby on Windows - OCI, Sequel and NLS_LANG

    Accessing the Oracle database from Ruby on Windows requires a few different things but generally works fine. This post covers some of the things that you would encounter and also shows how to access Oracle using Sequel so that you can get started. The information is collected from different places on the Internet but I’ve compiled it all here for ease of access.…


  9. Tips for Categorising and Storing E-mails

    I have evolved a habit and guidelines on how I handle e-mail categorisation and storing. This aids my productivity, so I am sharing it here in case it helps someone else. E-mail gets a bad rap and depending on who you ask, it’s terrible or wonderful. To me, it complements numerous other tools and works well for certain things.…


  10. 7 + 1 Tips for E-mail Subject Lines

    E-mail gets a bad rap and depending on who you ask, it’s terrible or wonderful. To me, it complements numerous other tools and I realised that I actually over-think the subject lines for my e-mails. So, I’m sharing that here!…


  11. JRuby: Using locally built JRuby JARs with Warbler

    If you decide to rebuild JRuby locally and want to use Warbler to create an executable JAR with the newly built JRuby, it’s not obvious what you should do. This post provides one way to manage this.…


  12. JRuby on Windows: Day 3 - Building from Source

    There are times when you will need to try out if your code works with a new version of JRuby or maybe, even make a change to the JRuby code and see if this is a change you want to contribute. This post touches on how to set up and build JRuby on your Windows PC.…


  13. Ruby Tricks 9 - Solving SassC Installation Errors

    On Windows, you might face an error installing SassC for use with Rails or with Jekyll, especially if you are using JRuby. Resolving this issue requires having a C/C++ compiler installed on your Windows system and on your path.…


  14. Cairo with Ruby - Converting code from Cairo to RCairo

    Cairo Graphics is a powerful 2D graphics library. Although Cairo is a C library, there are bindings available for many languages. The RCairo gem allows Ruby programs to use Cairo.…


  15. Cairo with Ruby - Samples using RCairo

    Cairo Graphics is a powerful 2D graphics library. Although Cairo is a C library, there are bindings available for many languages. The RCairo gem allows Ruby programs to use Cairo. This page has the simple samples from the Cairographics website, ported to run under Ruby using the RCairo gem.…


  16. Cairo with Ruby - Installation on Windows

    Getting Cairo Graphics to work with Ruby on Windows is straightforward although it scares you a bit in the installation.…


  17. Java on Windows: switching to a specific Java version/ runtime

    This post show how to have multiple Java runtime environments on your PC and switch between them on Windows so that a particular program uses the version that you want it to.…


  18. Journey to Jekyll: Part 9 - Upgrading to Ruby 2.6

    I have used Jekyll since Christmas 2016 and have never updated it since it worked fine for me. Just over a year ago, I tried to update to Ruby 2.7 when it was brand new and ran into a few errors and backed off for a while. In fact, I have been running Ruby 2.2 on my computer only for my Jekyll site. Finally, I decided to move up to Ruby 2.6 at least.…


  19. Journey to Jekyll: Part 8 - Speeding up the Site Part 2

    In Part 1 of Speeding up the Site, we optimised some images and removed AddThis. In this post, we try to optimise all the images before we push the site.…


  20. Journey to Jekyll: Part 8 - Speeding up the Site Part 1

    I started on the site around Christmas 2016 and have been adding things to it over time, assuming that a static site with very little Javascript and nothing special on it other than content and the necessary images would be quite fast (and it feels that way where I am). For some other work, I was looking at general principles for speeding up sites and decided to run a page speed test on my site also just to get a feel of some numbers.…