1. 24 JAPAN: Lessons for Project Managers and Programmers

    I watch a fair amount of television (well, technically, streaming video on apps) and recently, I watched (and really enjoyed) 24: Japan – the Japanese remake of the American 24 franchise. It was really good and as I watched through the 24 episodes, I started to notice that there are things that we can learn from the show about managing projects. That brings us to this post – written half-seriously and half in jest.…


  2. Bookmarks: Resources for Images, Sounds, etc.

    This post is a collection of links and resources where you can access and find images, sounds, etc. for your next presentation or creative pursuit such as creating your desktop wallpaper.…


  3. Despite problems, making WSL2 Work

    This should have been easy – enable Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 on Windows 10, and install a version of Linux. However, I ran into a few problems. This post is a collection of the things that I had to do (and where I found the information) in case I ever need to do it again.…


  4. Ruby Tips 11 - Level up your usage of the Ruby Hash (Part 1)

    A programming language like Ruby comes with lots of features and capabilities which we often don’t learn in detail and instead end up rewriting things in our application code. This post looks at a few simple things within the Hash class that you could be using.…


  5. Ruby Tips 10 - Adding enumeration to your class

    One of the cool things in Ruby is to be able to pass a block to a method or go through all the elements in a class (such as an array or hash) and do something as you step through each element. This is a short post on how to add an each method to your class.…


  6. Ruby 3.1 on Windows: Day 0 - install and Hello World

    Ruby is a dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. It has an elegant syntax that is natural to read and easy to write (from the Ruby web site). On Christmas Day 2021, the core team released version 3.1 with major improvements and new features. Now that RubyInstaller 3.1.0-1 has been released and available for some time, it’s a good time to set it up on Windows and try the features of Ruby 3.1. This post will help you get started with Ruby 3 on Windows, and covers the basics of installation. This post is along the same lines as the JRuby Day 0 post from earlier.…


  7. Solve: A fast Windows PC feels sluggish when moving through code or a list

    There are times when a Windows 10 PC feels very sluggish when you’re going through a list (e.g. emails in Outlook or Thunderbird) or even code in a text editor. Often, it has nothing to do with the computer per se, but just the keyboard settings.…


  8. We're having trouble with your reqest - Netflix fails on Windows

    Windows 10 has a nifty feature that allows you to use a second Windows 10 computer as a wireless display by casting your screen to it. However, you will likely have problems casting winodws that are running streaming video, such as Netflix or Amazon Prime.…


  9. Why we like to use JRuby

    We use JRuby quite a bit both for Rails applications and also for general Ruby scripts. I do get asked why one would use JRuby instead of Ruby (meaning C Ruby). This short post is an attempt to list out the main reasons we like to use JRuby. As background, I should mention that we are more a Ruby house and do quite a lot of work in Ruby.…


  10. Redirect all output to /dev/null on Windows Command

    A lot of Linux code redirects output to /dev/null as a way of not sending any output to the console. I work in Windows and often use Command Prompt (cmd.exe) as the command shell. This is just a small note to remember how to do the same in Windows.…


  11. Solve: VisualVM does not start up on Windows with OpenJDK

    I just downloaded and tried to run VisualVM on Windows 10 with OpenJDK 8 but it failed. The fix is simple but took a few minutes to find the solution.…


  12. JRuby on Windows: Using the G1 Garbage Collector Helps

    When running with JRuby, you have a few options for selecting the Garbage Collector. This post shows one observation on the memory consumption depending on the garbage collector and JAVA version.…


  13. JRuby on Windows: Day 3 - Using Apache POI (Java) to create XLSX files

    One of the great advantages of using JRuby is the ability to connect with Java libraries (JARs) and call Java code from your Ruby scripts. This post shows how to use Apache POI (the Java API for Microsoft Documents) to generate a simple XLSX file.…


  14. A more verbose prompt in Windows CMD Shell

    I work in Windows and often use Command Prompt (cmd.exe) as the command shell. This post touches on the new command prompt I use.…


  15. Rails 7.0 with Ruby 3.0 on Windows: It just works!

    Rails 7.0.0 was released just yesterday and as a Ruby user primarily on Windows, I was keen to see if it works and runs on Windows.…


  16. Ruby 2.7 on Windows: Install and Hello World

    Ruby is a dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. It has an elegant syntax that is natural to read and easy to write (from the Ruby web site). On Christmas Day 2020, the core team released version 3.0 with major improvements and new features. However, Ruby 3.0 was a major release with lots of changes and some people are still more familiar with Ruby 2.x first. Last week, it was announced that Ruby on Rails 7.0 would require Ruby 2.7 as the minimum supported version. So, I’m updating my system from Ruby 2.6.8 to Ruby 2.7.4 as my main working version. If you’re new to Ruby 2.7 on Windows, this post will help you get started with Ruby 3 on Windows, and covers the basics of installation. This post is along the same lines as the JRuby Day 0 post from earlier and also the Ruby 3.0 Day 0 post


  17. Oracle from Ruby on Windows - OCI, Sequel and NLS_LANG

    Accessing the Oracle database from Ruby on Windows requires a few different things but generally works fine. This post covers some of the things that you would encounter and also shows how to access Oracle using Sequel so that you can get started. The information is collected from different places on the Internet but I’ve compiled it all here for ease of access.…


  18. Tips for Categorising and Storing E-mails

    I have evolved a habit and guidelines on how I handle e-mail categorisation and storing. This aids my productivity, so I am sharing it here in case it helps someone else. E-mail gets a bad rap and depending on who you ask, it’s terrible or wonderful. To me, it complements numerous other tools and works well for certain things.…


  19. 7 + 1 Tips for E-mail Subject Lines

    E-mail gets a bad rap and depending on who you ask, it’s terrible or wonderful. To me, it complements numerous other tools and I realised that I actually over-think the subject lines for my e-mails. So, I’m sharing that here!…


  20. JRuby: Using locally built JRuby JARs with Warbler

    If you decide to rebuild JRuby locally and want to use Warbler to create an executable JAR with the newly built JRuby, it’s not obvious what you should do. This post provides one way to manage this.…




All Posts by Tags